Why did henry wadsworth longfellow write a psalm of life

Life is real!

A psalm of life conclusion

Not enjoyment, and not sorrow, Is our destined end or way; But to act, that each to-morrow Find us farther than to-day. Longfellow put into this. He left us his inspirational poems to make us want to do better with our lives. The speaker comes to the conclusion that he, and the listener, must be prepared at anytime for death, strife, or any trouble thrown at them. During a recent conversation with her we spoke of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poetry and one of her favorite poems, "A Psalm of Life. Longfellow was promised five dollars of its publication, though he never received payment. Let the fact go for what it is worth". And he assures that life is not so shady or worthless as it looks like, and it has much more potential than we think of.

We must carry on, reaching great heights, still not leaving. Let the fact go for what it is worth". He does not have faith in those who hold the pessimistic view of life. For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem.

Why did henry wadsworth longfellow write a psalm of life

The speaker of this piece begins by asking something of his listener. During a recent conversation with her we spoke of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poetry and one of her favorite poems, "A Psalm of Life. He describes the way in which he believes that no matter what death brings, the soul will never be destroyed. Think about it. Robertson noted, "The 'Psalm of Life,' great poem or not, went straight to the hearts of the people, and found an echoing shout in their midst. Life is earnest! Let us, then, be up and doing, With a heart for any fate; Still achieving, still pursuing, Learn to labor and to wait. In the final four lines of A Psalm of Life, the poet Longfellow asks us to be up at once and start working. We leave our mark whether it is good or bad and hope for the better that none will repeat. Not enjoyment, and not sorrow, Is our destined end or way ; But to act , that each to-morrow Find us farther than to-day. Among its many quoted lines are "footprints on the sands of time ". In the poem, A Psalm of Life, the poet sees life from an optimistic outlook. Act, -- act in the living Present! But that is not crucial. Life is real!

It also teaches us that we as humans leave a mark on the sands of time for all those to see in the distant future. He elaborates on this belief when he describes the ending of life as belonging solely to the body, and not to the soul.

A psalm of life figures of speech

It is an invocation to mankind to follow the path of righteousness, the right way to live this life. The fourth stanza of the poem A Psalm of Life is about our responsibilities in this life, about the work assigned to us. Act, -- act in the living Present! He left us his inspirational poems to make us want to do better with our lives. For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Heart within, and God o'erhead! According to him life is real and serious, not baseless or useless.

I rate this poem as a five out of five due to the effort and pride that Mr. The speaker of this piece begins by asking something of his listener. During a recent conversation with her we spoke of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poetry and one of her favorite poems, "A Psalm of Life.

A psalm of life poem

He was also inspired to write it by a heartfelt conversation he had with friend and fellow professor at Harvard University, Conway Felton. The speaker comes to the conclusion that he, and the listener, must be prepared at anytime for death, strife, or any trouble thrown at them. Let the fact go for what it is worth". Throughout the entire poem, the poet Longfellow conveys his view of life, instructs the readers to make the most out of this life, and inspires us to participate in the work and activity of life. In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life, Be not like the dumb, driven cattle! Longfellow compares this situation of our heart to the beating of the clothed drums at the funeral marches to the grave. Next week I will share some of my reflections on the poem. Here Longfellow slams the pessimists who sing melancholy songs, write sad poems, or thinks that nothing can be achieved in this life. Longfellow was further inspired by the death of his first wife, Mary Storer Potter, [3] and attempted to convince himself to have "a heart for any fate". He does not have faith in those who hold the pessimistic view of life.

In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life, Be not like the dumb, driven cattle! So we should not take this life lightly.

a psalm of life summary stanza by stanza

This is very important in suggesting the context of writing this poem. The speaker does not see, nor does he want to understand the world in that way.

Throughout the entire poem, the poet Longfellow conveys his view of life, instructs the readers to make the most out of this life, and inspires us to participate in the work and activity of life.

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A Psalm of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow